Renewable Energy: Tax Credits for Windspire

27 Jul

Windspire renewable energy - tax credits and incentivesClearly, tax incentives are necessary to motivate the public to invest in renewable energy sources. The capital expenditures for renewable energy are still high but we’re gaining ground.

The following includes tax credit information for Windspire products. We’ll continue to publish information on tax incentives and rebates as we find them. Please let us know if you know of any so we can help spread the word!

U.S. Federal Small Wind Tax Credit

U.S. home owners and businesses can save 30% off the total cost of their Windspires by applying for a 30% tax credit on their federal income taxes.  The credit applies to the total cost of the project, including the turbines and installation.

U.S. Businesses are also eligible to take their 30% tax credit as cash.  Under a new program introduced by the U.S. Treasury and Department of Energy, businesses may now collect their credit in cash within sixty days of completing an installation instead of waiting for an end of year tax credit.

To learn more about the program visit the U.S. Treasury website.

Local Rebates for Windspire Products

Local rebates are also available from state renewable energy funds and local power companies. In some states the rebates can be as high as $4,800 per Windspire.  Your local Windspire dealer can also help you understand your local and state rebates. You can also visit DSIRE, a comprehensive source of information on state, local, utility, and federal incentives and policies that promote renewable energy and energy efficiency.

From the Windspire blog: 9 Things to Know About Small Wind Power

Used to be if you wanted to put a wind turbine up at your house you either had to live on a remote farm, or grow your hair long and pledge allegiance to an aging group of touring musicians. Thanks to major improvements in technology and a general awareness of the benefits of making your own energy from clean and free wind, small wind power is going mainstream. According to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the US small wind market grew by 78% last year with many new turbines hitting the market. But more options don’t make finding the right wind power solution easy. If you are interested but not sure how to even get started, here are 9 things to know as you consider wind power. (Continue reading on the Windspire blog here)

I found the Windspire website while reading a HubSpot eBook about developing better B2B Facebook pages. The company’s Facebook page was one of the examples in the eBook; how to do a Facebook page right:

Windspire: www.windspireenergy.com
Employees: 11 to 25
Industry: Business Products
Facebook Fans: 2,7865
Page Features: Wall, Photos
Go to Facebook Page

Bailout Bill Big Win For Wind, Hybrids and Solar

07 Oct

Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush, the bailout legislation includes a $17 billion energy tax package; a big win for solar, wind and hybrids.

Here’s a summary of articles on the topic with links to the publishers and their full stories:

Wired.com: Bailout Bill Benefits Wind and Solar Power Companies.

The general public may not be thrilled with the $700 billion “financial rescue” package that the House approved and President Bush signed Friday, but the alternative energy industry cheered its passage because the legislation includes renewals of tax breaks that company executives had worried would expire at the end of the year.

ClimateProgress.com: The biggest winner is certainly solar. As Scott Sklar, former head of the Solar Energy Industries Association and now President of the Stella Group summarizes:

This package extends the 30-percent federal investment tax credit for both residential and commercial solar, small wind, ground-coupled heat pumps installations from 4 – 8 years. This bill also completely eliminates the $2,000 monetary cap for residential solar electric installations. This bill also provides a incentive tax credit (ITC) for water energy applications
(tidal, wave, and ocean currents and thermal) and combined heat and power. The federal production tax credit was extened for biomass power, geothermal and wind energy as well.

Also according to ClimateProgress.com, the 8-year extension of the ITC is a crucial step in ensuring the success in this country of one of the most critical climate solutions – solar baseload or concentrated stored thermal electric, which the solar industry considers one of the single most important issues the federal government needs to address for stable growth.

Plug in hybrids also benefit from the bailout package as reported by the Green Car Congress:

The credit is a base $2,500 plus $417 for each kWh of battery pack capacity in excess of 4 kWh, to a maximum of $7,500 for light-duty vehicles; $10,000 for vehicles with gross vehicle weights of more than 10,000 but less than 14,000 pounds; $12,500 for vehicles with a GVW of more than 14,000 but less than 26,000 pounds; and $15,000 for any vehicle with a GVW of more than 26,000 pounds.

Phaseout of the credit is to begin after the total number of qualified PHEVs in the US sold after 31 December 2008 is at least 250,000.

Qualifying vehicles must have a battery pack with at least 4 kWh of capacity–a provision that will preclude the inclusion of the first generation of Toyota PHEVs as well, potentially, as other lower all-electric range plug-ins.

ClimateProgress.com: This is a heck of a kickstart for plug-in hybrids, especially since $1 billion has been set aside for this tax credit. The Electric Drive Transportation Association also reports “The credit is available against the alternative minimum tax,” which is very good news. That means the upscale first buyers of this $45,000 car will actually be able to take advantage of this credit (see here).

Lots of other clean technologies benefited. For instance, “The measure increases the tax credit limitation for fuel cells from $500 to $1,500 per half kilowatt of capacity.” Frankly, $500 was the equivalent of doing nothing, whereas $1,500 may actually make some stationary fuel cells competitive. Geothermal
heat pumps
and cogeneration systems both get a well-deserved new 10% ITC.

DailyKos: A comprehensive article on the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (the “Bailout Plan”).

Environmental and Waste Management Industry Global Outlook Report

16 Sep

The environment and waste management industry is subject to various laws and regulations governing the environment across the world; known as “cradle to grave” laws here in the United States that regulate the treatment, handling and disposal of hazardous substances and the discharge of pollutants. Editors at Global Industry Analysts recently published a report on the global outlook for the industry. The following is their press release concerning the report. Read more

PHEV Resources Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

02 Sep

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) operate on power from either an electric battery or a gasoline engine; much like other hybrids. However, you can charge a PHEV using a standard electric outlet and subsequently drive 30 to 50 miles before using any gas. Short distance commuters can eliminate use of the gas engine altogether but still have a backup power source when needed.

Expect to see PHEVs on the road soon given the fuel efficiency, which is in the range of 100-150 miles per gallon. Daimler Chrysler is conducting extensive research and Toyota already announced it was working on a commercial PHEV. Besides the benefits PHEVs provide – outstanding fuel efficiency, lower greenhouse gas emissions – hybrid vehicles generally cost less to maintain then gas powered cars.

For additional information, consider the following PHEV websites:

Oil Obit Energy Environment

21 Aug

Oil Obit – help us write the obituary for our dependence on foreign energy supplies. Here you will find hard-core, high-level information pertaining to energy alternatives, renewable energy, solar, wind, geothermal and related solutions. You can also follow the money – venture capital, mergers and acquisitions in the energy and environmental fields.

Feel free to register and leave your comments, papers and topics for discussion.

ACEEE Champion of Energy Efficiency Awards

20 Aug

Oil Obit News: ACEEE PR/Washington, D.C.—Pacific Grove, California (August 20, 2008): The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) presented four Champion of Energy Efficiency Awards at its biennial conference, the Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. These awards recognize leadership and accomplishment in the energy efficiency field. Winners are selected based on demonstrated excellence in program implementation, research and development, energy policy, or private sector initiatives. The winners for 2008 are:

Philips for leading the way toward replacement of conventional incandescent lamps in the U.S. market. Philips initiated efforts to set incandescent lamp efficiency standards in the U.S. and played a pivotal role in working with the rest of the lighting industry, energy efficiency advocates, and Congress to negotiate the lamp standard provision that was enacted as part of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. This provision promises to be one of the most important energy efficiency appliance standards enacted in the past quarter century based on ACEEE’s analysis.

Dian Grueneich
for outstanding career-long leadership in the energy efficiency field, and innovation in utility regulation. Ms. Grueneich played an important role as a leader in the movement for energy efficiency policies and regulations in California. For the past three years, she has served on the California Public Utilities Commission overseeing the implementation of some of the most aggressive and successful utility energy efficiency programs in the world. She has played a major role in helping to develop incentives that reward utilities for meeting energy-saving goals, pushing for good evaluation to document program savings, and advocating for strong energy efficiency efforts as part of California’s climate change action plans.

ENE (Environment Northeast) for shepherding policies that engage stakeholders, substantially increase energy efficiency investments, and institutionalize support for energy efficiency throughout New England. Environment Northeast has played a pivotal role for over a decade in advocating for energy efficiency policies and regulations in New England, including an important role in seeking the inclusion of energy efficiency in the plans for the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) agreement.

Austin Energy, Roger Duncan, General Manager,
for decades of leadership in energy efficiency and sustainable energy policies and programs that serve as models for utility innovation. Over the past two decades, Austin Energy has played a leadership role in delivering efficiency and sustainable energy programs to their customers. During this time, Mr. Duncan has advocated for and overseen the implementation of these efforts, recently assuming the role of general manager. Austin Energy and Mr. Duncan have not been content to just serve their customers’ needs, but have advocated for sustainable energy policies nationally within both the public power community and in the broader utility community as well.

These winners were nominated by their peers, and selected by a committee of ACEEE’s Board of Directors from an impressive pool of more than 75 nominations. Selection criteria were based on each nominee’s impact, innovation, and leadership in the energy efficiency field.