Energy Management Important to Healthcare Leaders

Energy efficiency, Wind MillWe tend to either love or hate the current healthcare industry. Rising insurance costs and outrageous healthcare bills upset us all. But, it appears the industry leaders are taking energy management seriously. According to a recent survey, energy management is more important to healthcare leaders than to executives in other industry sectors.

According to new research from the American Society for Healthcare Engineering and Johnson Controls, energy efficiency continues to grow in importance in the healthcare sector as organizations do more than ever to “go green.” (SOURCE: Johnson Controls Institute for Building Efficiency)

BACKGROUND

In March 2010, Johnson Controls’ Institute for Building Efficiency, the International Facility Management Association (IFMA), and the American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE) conducted a survey of
executives and managers responsible for making investments and managing energy use in commercial buildings across the world. As part of the Energy Efficiency Indicator (EEI) broad survey to look at the trends in energy efficiency throughout the worldwide business community, Johnson Controls wanted to include a separate analysis of responses from organizations in the healthcare industry. Of the 2,882 respondents polled worldwide, 288 operated in the healthcare industry, and 246 were ASHE members.

The EEI survey examines what healthcare organizations are doing in response to rising energy costs, what factors are motivating efficiency improvements, how many organizations are planning to make investments, what payback they expect on energy efficiency investments, and what technologies and practices they have been implementing in their facilities.The Johnson Controls Institute for Building Efficiency, the International Facility Management Association and the American Society for Healthcare Engineering conducted an online survey of decision-makers responsible for managing energy. The Energy Efficiency Indicator survey results included a separate analysis of responses from healthcare organizations. (SOURCE: 2010 Energy Efficiency Indicator – Healthcare Sector Report, Oct. 2010)

Here’s an excerpt of the findings reported by the Johnson Controls Institute for Building Efficiency:

The survey looked at issues such as what organizations are doing in response to rising energy costs, what factors are driving efficiency improvements, what payback they expect on projects, and what technologies and practices they are applying. Highlights of the survey include:

  • 59% of healthcare organizations believe energy management is extremely or very important, compared to 52% of respondents across all industries.
  • 66% of healthcare respondents are paying more attention to energy efficiency than they were a year ago.
  • Cost savings is the biggest factor driving energy efficiency investments in healthcare; enhancing image and taking advantage of government or utility incentives are next.
  • Nearly 50% of healthcare respondents cited energy efficiency in buildings as their top strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
  • The average maximum allowable payback period for energy efficiency investments in healthcare is 3.3 years, down from 4.2 years in 2008.
  • The top barriers to capture of potential energy savings are lack of internal capital and inability to identify projects with sufficient ROI.

Click here to visit the Institute for Building Efficiency and read or download the complete survey report.